Bluegill - Big Bluegill

Do you love big bluegill?

Do any of you cast small jigs?
1/64 and 1/32 with no float.. I really like casting jigs and fishing with no float. And slowly working them back. I make my own hair jigs and they fall so nice and slowly. I just lift n let them fall again.

Just wish I could get more distance. Without having to use a really long rod.

What should I be expecting casting distance wise? I'm using a daiwa presso 6.5ft rod and 4lb mono line. I would like to use some 2lb line but I just don't know if I can bring myself to do it.

The rod is new one to me and I really like it so far. Thanks

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Thanks to all for the advice and help it's much appreciated!

THERE IS ALSO;;   THE MECHANICS;; OF THE REEL !!  ACCORDING TO ALL BAS SPROS;;;  EVEN THE MANUFACTURES THEMSELVES !!  THE MECHANICS;; OF A SPINNING REEL;; IS ALL ---- WRONG !!  BY USING A SPIN REEL ALL DAY;; IT WILL ;; NO MATTER WHAT;; TWIST LINE;; INTO THE REEL !!!   BY REMOVING ALL TACKLE;; BEFORE RETIREING AT THE END OF THE DAY;; THEN ;; STRIP OFF;; ALL OF THE LINE;; DOWN-- TO THE BEGINNING OF THE THE SPOOL;;;;; DRAG IT A BIT;; ;; LETTING THE WATER; SERVE AS A DRAG;; START -- RE-WINDING THE SPOOL  IT WILL  ( HOPEFULLY )  REMOVE  LINE TWIST;; ALLOWING;; FOR THE NEXT DAYS START FISHING TRIP !!

Smoltz, micro-jigging for bluegill is how we taught our kids to fish. The method used was called the cork loop method, where a loop is tied in end of a 6# monofilament line using a surgeon’s knot. Typically the finished loop was a foot from the knot to the bottom of the loop. After cutting the bottom of the loop, there are two 12-inch tagged ends coming off the knot. On one tagged end a round, weighted cork is attached, and on the other a 1/16th ounce ball jig with a #6 EC jig hook. When cast out the lure would sink to a fixed depth of less than two feet.

The beauty of this rig is even a small child can cast 20 feet or more, and when reeled back in, they can reel all the way down to the cork and jig. My five year old granddaughter master this in one day, catching 7 stocked trout in a Manito Springs pay fish pond. The type of rod and reel doesn’t really matter. Even a child’s Snoopy rig will work for young kids.

The real advantage comes with having a direct line to the jig. No need to worry about the float telling you a fish is checking out your lure. Even the subtlest bite can be felt before the cork knows about it.

Later our kids advanced to shore fishing for white bass using the same type of rigging, out catching other anglers by as many as 4 or 5 to their one. The weighted cork is the ticket to getting the lure where you wanted it, and three decades later I’m still using this method.

If interested, I can detail how we made the weighted corks and where to purchase supplies to make your own.

Duane, this seems like a novel way to eliminate the need to have any sort of swivel controlling two pieces of line down from the mainline. I love your idea; it is new to me.

I do have a question: Once you make the loop and knot it, then cut it to create the two lower ends, is one of the resulting ends more of a direct line back above the knot to the "main line?" The reason I ask relates to strength if this were used on larger fish and stronger fish like white bass. Is one of the two lines better suited for the hook and the resulting tug-of-war with a fish, the other okay for a cork? 

I'm out of town, else I could tie that knot and work out the logic of whether the two tag ends are just supported from the knot . . .  or one or both are "continuous" lines from above the knot.

Thanks!  Brad

Two excellent observations Brad. I have never been asked the second question before, but yes, I try to use the main line rather than the knotted line for the jig, however that is a bit tricky to determine especially with smaller diameter mono. But once you figure it out you shouldn’t have any problem determining which tagged line that is. For white bass I have gone to 8# test mono some years back because I have difficulty seeing to retie smaller lines on the water. However, six-pound mono works okay for the sandies, but not so well for a large wiper or stripper should one happen along. In my experience though, the knot for the loop was broken no more frequently than the Palomar knot at the hook, and occasionally the hook just got straightened!

The beauty of not having to work with a three way swivel is compromised to some degree by line twist, so after retrieving the first few casts I take the jig and adjust the knot so it’s behind the hook eye while unraveling any line twist for both jig and cork at the same time. Usually this take a few casts before you can begin skipping the process after each cast, but it only takes a couple of seconds to do this. It’s important with kids to teach them these two steps because this method of fishing is a lot like vertical jigging in some of it’s presentations, and the jig needs to be sitting correctly in the water to look normal to the fish. The same is true when weighted cork loop fishing a larger jig with a spinner for white bass. Line twist and jig knot readjustments are inevitable and can mess up the retrieve if not corrected before recasting, but that’s true of any type of rigging.

Another step I take is to add a #12 barrel swivel to the wire for the weight inside the cork. I use an inexpensive wire former to make these wires, and the swivel is attached permanently to the wire placed inside the weight. This eliminates much of the line twisting problems.

For more experienced fishermen, using a clear, solid, plastic torpedo shaped float works fine with light lines, but I would recommend using a swivel snap for the float attachment. This makes for easy reattachment of different size or colored floats, as well reduced line twist. 

 morgan

Duane, I'll experiment with this today as I'll be spooling on some new line on a new spinning reel.

It occurs to me that one could tie a doubled-line Uni knot where it creates, on traditional terminal tackle, two lines through the eye (like a Palomar knot), then a looped tag end (normally cut off) that could be cut to make two more accessible lines for various attachments. That'd potentially be two mainline and two tag ends (4) emanating from the knot. I'll tie it and see what sort of configuration the various "ends" create; but, it'd seem that your cork loop method might have endless combinations to experiment with. One question is whether the doubled-line Uni knot will hold in place and not slip. Another test will be needed if it passes the first related to any practicality. For crappie anglers, other panfish, too, who use multiple hooks and weights, this might be a cool way to make a rig just using line, again without the need for a swivel.   Thanks for the follow-up!  Brad

Bingo Brad, you do catch on quickly! There are many variations to this loop knot version of fishing, which are simple and quick to tie. Your suggestion of using a Uni-knot is very interesting. Uni-knots are becoming popular with anglers for tying on their lures, and the claim is the quick and easy to tie Uni-knot for mono is as strong as either the Palomar or improved cinch knot.

By cutting the loop knot on the side of the loop instead of the bottom, you now have short and a long tagged ends that can be used for drop shot rigging. I use the short tagged end for a slip weight attached with a split shot when river fishing for trout. This method allowed me to effectively spin cast fish the headwaters of the Missouri river below the second dam in areas where even fly fishermen could not reach.

Say you want to add a weighted drop line below an already tied on jig without retying. Insert a 12-inch long loop about a foot above your lure and cut one side of the loop line near the knot. You now have a drop line to attach your weight about a foot below your jig. Works just as well for adding a second jig, either above or below the existing jig, depending on the size of the loop and where it’s tied.

Once the concept is mastered, you can imagine all sorts of ideas, such as spider rigging without the need for terminal tackle and extensive tying procedures. I’m looking forward to seeing what you come up with Brad.

morgan     

morgan/all,

So, what I have done here to illustrate my "test" of a simple Uni knot is to use some string so it shows up better, then tie a Uni knot to an object, then cut the line through the eye of the object so that it creates two pieces (off on the left side), then the other piece is the tag end (sticking up in photo) . . . which I leave on. And, you can see the mainline going back toward the rod moving off to the right. Many of you know that a Uni knot can be tightened down anywhere above the actual hook. It doesn't have to be cinched down tightly and it is often used as a very good substitute for a loop knot. Loop knots leave some slack in the knot above, say, a crankbait, and lots of guys like them to let lures "swing." Here, I cinch it down tightly to form the two lines to attach "things" to. So, one could tie these "long" and cut one shorter and have two hooks. The tag end could be used for a bobber or a weight. All sorts of varieties and possibilities! Now, if you "double" your line, it'd create 4 on the left, two tag ends. That might be overkill.  Anyway, thanks for the tip. This might be a nice way to customize some rigs. Two different color lures . . . see what is biting; two different lengths, see at what level they are biting and on and on.   Brad

… excellent discussion and a nice read!... Smoltz did you settle on a set-up combination for throwing the tiny jigs?

Hey guys have not been on for a while. Fell into some hard times. Life can be tough but the Lord is gracious.

Anyhow, no SLIP...  last I had been at it, I was still fishing the daiwa but with 2lb line with good results. I still need to try the micro braid! Maybe I'll get some. Have not been ice fishing this year but I plan on getting back at it a lot this year again as soon as ice breaks up n begins to warm. Me and my son will be getting after it! Been starting to get back to reading and looking and checking things out again. 

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